Timeline

April 19, 1775: Minutemen and redcoats clash at Lexington and Concord “The shot heard around the world.”

June 15, 1775: George Washington named Commander in Chief.

1776: Black Rock Fort built at the foot of Grovers Hill.

August 27, 1776: Redcoats defeat the George Washington’s army in the Battle of Long Island. Washington’s army escapes at night.

September 15, 1776: The British occupy New York City. General George Washington is not able to leave a spy network in New York.

September 22, 1776: Nathan Hale, George Washington’s first spy, executed as a spy in New York.

Summer 1778: Culper Spy Ring launched. Caleb Brewster is the only spy ring member to use his real name. He travels back and forth from Black Rock to Long Island carrying spy letters, observing enemy troop movements of the British occupied Long Island, and acting as privateer on Long Island Sound.  Brewster lead numerous whaleboat raids against British and Loyalist installations on Long Island.

Caleb Brewster carried key spy letters including the one that leads to capture of traitor Benedict Arnold.

July 8, 1779: Fairfield, CT, burned down with fire by British. Black Rock is saved by spy information of British troop movements and leads to canon fired at Saint Mary’s by the Sea, which keeps Black Rock from British attack.

QUESTION:

HOW DID CALEB BREWSTER GET THE SPY LETTERS TO GEORGE WASHINGTON?

ANSWER: With the first mounted cavalry of the United States: The Dragoons, Sheldon’s Horse, The Second Continental Light Dragoons. These mounted cavalry also participated in attacks against the British in Long Island with Caleb Brewster as Captain.

(Why is this not in the history books yet?  Because the identity of the spies was hidden for 150 years until the 1930’s most likely due to fear of retaliation in further generations.)

To better understand the role the Caleb Brewster, the Dragoons played in the American Revolution, I have begun to create a timeline integrating the location of General George Washington’s Headquarters, and the Dragoon locations into a timeline, for students and scholars around the world.